"BIG CHANGES' with SHOPS on the streets.

Frontpage Forum People & Places of Wolverhampton "BIG CHANGES' with SHOPS on the streets.

This topic contains 24 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Billy 2 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #5193


    Billy

    Participant

    The Changing Face of Wolverhampton

    Building Society Lich st

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5194


    Billy

    Participant

    This one in Victoria Street.

    Billy recalls the Victoria Street of his youth looking towards Queen Square in 1955

    VICTORIA  STREET 1950'S

    On this photograph you will notice all the West side of the street has been rebuilt in the late 1920’s, but on the opposite East side the buildings. themselves are similarly unchanged in appearance as they were four decades on
    The Hippodrome theatre, having replaced The Empire in 1922 faces again down Victoria Street from Queen’s Square , The Queen’s Arcade, built in 1910 compliments the Star and Garter next to it at the top of Victoria Street, and this is how the Street is best remembered, by older Wulfrunians, before the advent of the Mander Centre a decade later.

    I will take a walk up this impressive line of bustling shops of my youth that once supplied all household daily needs, and by mentioning the names of the shops and premises as I recall them it may stir the memories of old Wulfrunians, who remember them or evoke the imagination of those who do not.

    On the West side
    Dominating the corner of Skinner Street-Victoria Street, was ‘Bradburys’ ladies outfitters, and the morris pick-up parked next door, to close really to the zebra crossing, stands outside the S.M.C. shirt-makers.

    Besides little Woolworths and Murdoch’s radio and record stores, there were a couple of other shops, with offices above, followed by the Giffard Arms, Hudsons, leather goods, James Beattie and finally Burton’s, on the top left facing in the Square.

    On the East side
    On the opposite side of the street Don Everall’s Booking office takes up corner position, at the bottom of Bell Street, then Dave Miller the jeweller with the “New Hotel” at that time owned by Banks’s Brewery. an old coaching house on the corner of John’s Lane,
    Across on the opposite corner of John’s Lane undergoing some change but still standing proud at No. 19, is the old “Copper Kettle,” Harry Hughes has just opened a baby care business in the front of the shop, renaming it ‘Lindy Lou’s’.

    Next door at No.s, 18a and 18b, in the former double fronted Georgian residence, is a branch of George Mason grocers, some might recall this building in the 1980s, as the Wolverhampton branch of Dan Price’s Bicycle Store’s.

    Then, at No’s 18 and 17 respectively were Yarnolds drapers, and ‘Halfords’ Cycle Store.
    At that time between Yarnolds and Halfords was a door, which led to the ‘Regent’ a high class restaurant, which was situated above these two shops.
    J & W Poveys confectioners and cafe came next, on the entrance to Farmers Fold- the small alley leading back into the other half of Johns lane.
    On the other side of the alley, taking up No’s 11 to 15 was a multi- purpose store on three levels belonging to ‘Bedford Williams’, it was deemed to be (The poor mans Beatties). and next door at No. 10, was the rubber goods store of Chas Hunter’.
    Adjoining Hunter’s with the removal van parked outside, was Smarts Furnishers at No.9, and finally, the “Star and Garter” next to the splendid “Queen’s Arcade” and Queen Square.’

    I am sure there is no one today, who would disagree this photograph shows Victoria Street at its best!

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5206


    Billy

    Participant

    David Greenway on his Facebook group posted (Herbert Street 2 ) two interesting pictures of Stafford Street in transition in the early 1960’s.

    The first picture the is of the two hundred yards, between Then Charles Street and Nursery Street situated – opposite The Quickfit garage and the Maltings today, fronting Faulkland Patch.

    My Comments where:
    The top photo is of Carvers Purpose built building dated early 1960’s. They moved there from the top of Stafford Street in the mid 1950’s.

    This photo I have placed below – shows the demise of the shops in the late 1950’s which left the waste ground, from Charles Street to the Carvers Building.
    Today that building part of the University, and stands opposite the Maltings

    Hoopers demise 2
    The second Picture

    The bottom picture dated about the same time. Shows the waste ground where E.L. Bouts Motor Engineers removed to Merridale Lane. from.
    Opposite the hoardings (on its last legs) is the former YMCA complex re-located then to Thornley Street .

    This photo I have placed below is a little earlier and shows, E.L Bouts across on the right facing Copes Motor Cycle showrooms with the University replacing all the old shops on the top west side of Stafford Street in 1956.
    While on the east side at the corner of Littles Lane is the former Percy Thomas Dance Hall part of the YMCA complex

    Copes & Bouts

    I hoe that puts you in the picture!.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5227


    Billy

    Participant

    There have been a few comments on local facebook groups recently regarding how the name “Little Woolworths” came about. Here a some facts regarding that once amazing store.

    When Frank Winfield Woolworth opened his first store in Wolverhampton it was not in Dudley Street, but in existing premises vacated by John Cavit, house furnishers, at 58, 59 Victoria Street, almost opposite Farmers Fold. ( You may recall Barratts of Feckenham there later).

    WOOLIES VIC 1928jpg

    This store closed in the late 1960’s.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5228


    Billy

    Participant

    The nickname, “Little Woolies” – came about in 1925, in view of the fact a second larger Woolworths store, was opened in Dudley Street, in premises vacated by Hyam & Co clothiers.

    WOOLIES DUDLEY ST

    ‘Woolworths’ Dudley Street pictured late 1930’s.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5229


    Billy

    Participant

    The former 19th century frontage of the older building pictured, above was replaced in the 1960’s, when the new purpose built store, entered the “Mander Centre” age.

    WOOLIES DUD  1974

    It was at that time reputed to be one of the largest Woolworths’ store’s in Europe.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5230


    Billy

    Participant

    I can’t remember now were I came across this photo taken from the Dudley Street entrance to the Wulfrun Centre,
    Foster Bros as you can see are still then on the corner of Bilston Street and I would say Littlewoods are were Primark is today.

    DUDLEY ST  FOSTERS jpg

    On the back of the articulated lorry on this early Sunday morning shot we see what appear to be a covered staircase.
    Now although I am not certain. I would like to believe these stairs are going to form the new Dudley Street access for Woolworths at the time they releliquish the upper floors of their formidable 1960’s building to “Boots” chemists and just retain their basement.floor opening into the Mander Centre.

    What do you think?

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5269


    Billy

    Participant

    Probably one of the smallest shops in town in the 1970’s

    Tarver

    Any idea where it was?.

    Below the old cellar head.

    • #5804


      Billy

      Participant

      When Chapel Ash was at its most elegant it heralded shops and trades of every description. Four doors from Meadow Street during the first World War stood the ornate frontage of A.M.Ranger, Confectionist.

      60 Chapel Ash

      In its place today stands the appropriately name Co-operative funeralcare. Now Chapel Ash certainly looks as though it has been through the wars of late. and there are a few buildings I would say are in need of such drastic measures.

      60 Chapel Ash 2011

      Below the old cellar head.

  • #5342


    Billy

    Participant

    Hills and Steele Dudley Street, pictured just after the war with their offers of all household goods on sale from 3d to £5.
    Advertise an Easter Parade in an attempt to out do their rivals Woolworths next door.
    The British Home Stores now stands on this site in 2015

    Hills & Steele

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5373


    Billy

    Participant

    Somebody asked me the other day Whats happening with TESCO and the ROYAL HOSPITAL. Well as you may not know TESCO workers have now gone from the site. We have been told the are now looking for buyers and an announcement should be made soon. “Please don’t hold your Breath”

    TESCO DEPARTED

    Although I think they have left the building in pretty good order considering.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5411


    Billy

    Participant

    Phillp Farmer, on the facebook group WSAC&N.writes – The building work on the old Vodafone shop on corner Dudley street/king st has uncovered the Dunn and co sign any idea how long they traded. How old the building is and previous tenants. The work has exposed the stained glass windows relating to Dunns.
    I took the liberty to answer him.

    Well Phillip
    Dunn’s were “Hatters” They originated to my knowledge in Queen Street in the late 1800’s.

    By the turn of the century they were here on the corner of St John’s Lane, in that tall slim majestic building that houses (The Photo Shop today).

    Dudley Street 1946

    For one reason or another, in the1950’s they moved across the road to the corner of King Street ( The phone shop today) Replacing Bywaters Pork shop.

    As Shirleys photo shows they were still there in the late 1960’s when Montague Burtons replaced the Irish Linen Store on the opposite corner in King Street.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5413


    tonydavies

    Participant

    Ref the old Royal Hospital, it wouldn’t surprise me to see a property developer buy up the place to turn into luxury apartments or office suites. Taking into account the fact that it’s an extremely attractive building, I don’t think they would have too much trouble selling/renting them either. Anything rather than see the place deteriorate again.

  • #5414


    Billy

    Participant

    I agree with everything you say Tony We just have to keep our fingers crossed.

    I did see today though some good news regarding the Dixons Paint building opposite it appears is again being used by Dixons.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5432


    Billy

    Participant

    We have had a very interesting comment from Ms jan coates
    July 26, 2015 at 10:57 am (edit)

    I remember Liptons, The HOME AND CALONIAL , I remember Miss Horton’s and the hair ribbons they sold as well as wool and materials.

    My father built the clock on Charles Clarks building in Chapel Ash and my aunt ran Bennett Clark’s photographers with partner William Hart, who she later married.

    What a glorious past Wolverhampton family history you have Jan.
    Bennett Clark now theres a name to conjure up many memories and stories.

    I have many photo’s take from the studio of this prolific Wolverhampton photographer.
    I shall post a picture on the forum and on our facebook group. and hope other interested members will add their thoughts on this great Wulfrunian.

    BENNETT CLARK

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5511


    Billy

    Participant

    Wendy Green commented on her stay at “Gibsons”the well established Chemists on the corner of Blossoms Fold indeed I remember it well.

    in https://flic.kr/p/y1Fcgg

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5667


    Billy

    Participant

    It was a terrible shame and a definite mistake on the part of our Corporation
    When they demolished our century old market hall and built the Civic Centre on the Site.
    But even that costly blow to our heritage could have been softened if they had left the site as an open space to form a nice tree lined Square.

    What do you think.

    CENTRE MAP color59

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5710


    Billy

    Participant

    MANDERS

    Looking up from Farmers fold circa 1920 we see a century ago Mander Bros Varnish Works covered most of the east end on both sides of St Johns Street.

    St Johns street 1960

    Fast forward forty years and the remains of Manders Works will be transferred to its premises at Old Heath Road and these recently opened shops at the bottom of the east end will together with the old works be demolished to make way for the New Mander Centre.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5711


    Billy

    Participant

    Blossoms Fold small

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5720


    Billy

    Participant

    There can’t be many Facebook members that have a great knowledge of our two tragically lost Arcades .

    How we came to lose one of these Majestic Edwardian buildings never mind the two is beyond me.

    But alas we did .
    Queen Arcade Plan

    This plan is dated 1930 and it gives you a rough idea of the lay-out of the Queens’ Arcade.

    Were in my youth you would have seen Jaeger Fashions and Hindes tobacconists either side of Its main entrance in the Square .
    A children’s favourite pastime ,was a visit to Fletchers booksellers and check out the stamps, (every lad collected foreign stamps at that time) then down the steps into Victoria Street.

    As you can see it wasn’t quite as large and lengthy as it companion the Central Arcade and more circular in shape. housing probably ten businesses downstairs with offices above.

    Most younger Wulfrunians seem to get the changes and occupants mixed up in the two arcades now I spent many happy hours exploring both of these icons and will only be to pleased to pass on any information regarding them.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5736


    Billy

    Participant

    Today in 2016, and perhaps as I did in 1958, if you are looking for a select shop to purchase a engagement or Wedding ring the name Rudell’s springs to mind in Darlington Street.
    But it wasn’t always that way.

    Samuels 1950

    H Samuel now thats a name most Wulfrunians are familiar with . Older folk will recall the classic facade of the pre-war building on the corner of Queen Street.

    Gold House

    But perhaps less known was their much older rival competitor James Langman a little further down Dudley Street whose premises were later gobbled up by Marks and Spencer.

    What brought these two Wolverhampton Jewellers to mind. Well I had a very interesting e-mail from my friend and fellow member of Lost Wolverhampton now residing in Winsconsin. John Favill.

    To quote John: Dear Billy,
    Just recently my wife Mae found a receipt for the purchase of her mothers wedding ring made out on July 17th 1929 at James Langman Ltd., The Gold House 21 Dudley Street.
    The cost of the plain gold ring cost £2 five shillings, a measure of how times have changed over 87 years.
    To prove how popular were Langmans at the time I also had a copy of a similar receipt from 1924 When my grandfather purchased a 18 carat Diamond & Coral ring unmounted for £3.ten shillings.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5782


    Billy

    Participant

    A friend from my youth Albert Edwards late of Thornley Street knew there had been a well established Public House in Queen Square But couldn’t recall where it was or when it disappeared. The Public House in question was “Harleys Vaults” I recall this building very well – in fact it was one of the first pubs I went in. The licensee at the time in the 1940’s, was Jimmy Hart a friend of my fathers and as this pub only had a six day licence Dad and I would call in and see jimmy on a Sunday morning when the pub was officially closed.</p>
    <p>https://flic.kr/p/Kre2Gk</p&gt;
    <p>Well here you will see Harleys Vaults as it appeared in the time of the first World War, on the far left on this photograph,and its appearance would be more or less the same as I recall in the 1940’s, the facade very much in keeping with the “Posada”its companion in Lichfield Street.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5783


    Billy

    Participant

    HARLEYS VAULTS 1913

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5784


    Billy

    Participant

    Lindy Lou

    THE HAND INN TUNWALL STREET

    Best remembered as “Lindy Lou” 19 Victoria Street and 42 St John’s Street.

    An early recollection.

    In a Terrier of Sir Walter Leveson’s Wolverhampton estates dated 29th September 1609, one of his eighty or so tenants is named as Nicholas Worthington, occupier of one messuage and common Inne called the Hand in Tunwall Street adjoyinge John’s Lane on the South Syde.

    There can be no doubts in identifying this Inn site. Tunwall Street is the ancient name for Victoria Street, and Johns Lane most of which is now absorbed in to the Mander Centre.

    On the 12th June 1750 the freehold passed to John Jesson of Graseley, a prosperous Wolverhampton Attorney.
    As to the occupancy during its ownership of the Jessons the Town rate Books have survived, and local trade directories give a few clues.
    By 1818 the property or part of it was being used as a Bakery by Edward Farmer 19 Cock Street.

    Finally, in 1873, Henry Hughes established his bakery business and the very long family connection of the following century is to well known to need. a repetition here.

    The writer was shown over the building in 1957 courtesy of the then present Mr Hughes who had recently renamed the former “Copper Kettle” – “Lindy Lou.”

    At the front of the shop premises in Victoria he had opened a business similar to the Mothercare shops today. At the side of the shop in St John’s Street, he was stocking Fruit and Veg.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5806


    Billy

    Participant

    Dudley Street 1946

    This crowded scene in Dudley Street in 1946, has a wealth of interest .
    The view is toward Queen Square ,with the “British Home Stores on your left, and “Marks and Spencer” opposite on your right.
    To the right of “Joans” ladies fashion shop, was the “Dudley Arms” public house, with a similar frontage to the “Giffard Arms” in Victoria street.
    In 1954. “Joans” will move from this spot and re-locate in Queen Square on the corner of Lich Gates, in premises up till then owned by ‘Copes’ wines and spirit merchants, and British Home Stores will then extend and take up the space left by Joans.
    Next door and above the “Dolcis” shoe shop was photographers, and I doubt there’s a family in Wolverhampton that haven’t a photo tucked away somewhere, that was taken at “Jerome’s”.
    “Buxton & Bonnet were next door, they and Foster Bros (close by on the corner of Bilston street,) held the sway in town for smart childrens’ wear, should clothing coupon’s be available.
    Across the road with the fading *“Dove of Peace” sign on the wall was the top menswear shop, the ‘Fifty Shilling Tailors’, and above the tailors, and the next door premises, with its side entrance, was the “Savoy ”billiard hall were most of the “sharks’ of the day would ply their skills.
    But what makes this photo extra special for me, is that it shows a flat fronted electric milk float on its return journey to the “Levedale.”
    The entrance to the Levedale dairy in the 40’s and 50’s, was situated at the far end of Dudley Street in between Two former public houses, the “Kings Head’ and the Hen and Chickens.”
    *The ‘Dove of Peace’ was on a protruding wall on the east side of Dudley Street, close to Queen Street. It remained there till this building was demolished in the early 1960’s.
    The story goes that the Dove was painted on the wall in 1939, to end an acrimonious dispute between to rival tailors businesses who were neighbours, Burtons and the Fifty -Shilling Tailors.

    Below the old cellar head.

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