Billy

  • Delightful two for the price of one. I am very pleased you enjoyed the post. I would like to place your comment on our Lost Wolverhampton Facebook Group with a photo of a class of twins at Red Cross Street. You may have seen it before and you may recall the caption that went with it, I have it somewhere.

  • Billy commented on the post, On The Heath 1 week, 3 days ago

    Thank you for your comment, Amar.

    Yes, there is nothing much if anything left of old Wolverhampton Road from Heath town to New Cross for you today, apart from your childhood memories.

    But then again thats the case for most of us old Wulfrunians today.

  • Thank you for your kind comment carol. I personally have never seen a photo of Littles Lane before it was rebuilt in the late 1920’s – Regarding the surname Patrick it wasn’t a common Irish name to my knowledge, but there was an Abraham Patrick, Umbrella maker, in North Street Wolverhampton in 1847 Post Office directory.

  • Hi,
    Wasyl Thank you for spotting my errors, most appreciated. As I have often stated I am no academic Just a streetwise Old Wulfrunian. With a passion for lost Wolverhampton.

  • WOLVERHAMPTON A TALE OF TWO CITIES

    My pictures and stories I hope will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton at various times particularly in relation to the street scene and […]

    • Hi Bill,

      Just read your latest article.

      It would seem to be that there are 2 errors .

      1st in the line following “They came to the house in Tup Street.”….You start the paragraph with “There”, I personally believe it ought to be “Their”.

      2nd you’ve misquoted the Title 1982, which should read 1892 as you quoted in the first sentence.

      • Hi,
        Wasyl Thank you for spotting my errors, most appreciated. As I have often stated I am no academic Just a streetwise Old Wulfrunian. With a passion for lost Wolverhampton.

  • WOLVERHAMPTON A TALE OF TWO CITIES

    My pictures and stories I hope will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton at various times particularly in relation to the street scene […]

  • Thank You Pat That’s
    what I am all about stirring memories.

  • Thank You Wasyl. I didn’t think the exact date was that important If you notice I put late 1960’s in the following paragraph.
    I recall the school moving to Red Cross Street and the Continental grocers you mentioned Incidentally I also recall looking across at those few remaining houses on the south side of Paternoster Row when I got married at…[Read more]

  • WOLVERHAMPTON A TALE
    OF TWO CITIES

    My pictures and stories I hope will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton at various times particularly in relation to the street scene and […]

  • Do you remember the Bluecoat School?

    Well, in this series, I hope my pictures and stories will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton since 1750, particularly in relation to the […]

  • Billy commented on the post, Something Fishy 7 months ago

    Hi Bill nice of you to get in touch. I certainly would like to see photos of the old Market I live in Bridgnorth. But I travel to a friends print shop in Wolverhampton most days. How can we meet up The one problem is I don’t have transport. My email address is billy@lostwolverhampton.co.uk. Best Wishes. Billy H

  • Hello Ann
    Request to join our facebook group Lost Wolverhampton and put your request on there
    You will find Myself and perhaps others will find many pictures to remind you of your holiday trips including The Colonades (The Arches) as they are known.
    Best Wishes Billy.

  • Welcome to Billy’s Picture Book!

    In this new series, I hope my pictures and stories will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton since 1750, particularly in relation to the street […]

    • Hello Ann
      Request to join our facebook group Lost Wolverhampton and put your request on there
      You will find Myself and perhaps others will find many pictures to remind you of your holiday trips including The Colonades (The Arches) as they are known.
      Best Wishes Billy.

  • Hi Rosemary – All though Montrose Street was shown on the 1842 Wolverhampton Tithe Map there were only a few buildings at that time nothing much regarding housing. The slum district of Carribee was really limited to the area from Stafford Street east as far as Carbery Street (Westbury Street).

  • Thank you for the information, Pedro, most appreciated, I must admit I didn’t delve into the history of the lady involved – My main aim as a Wolverhampton historian was to give an insight into the places of interest in the story published by the two gentlemen credited with writing the story.

  • In modern times, it is home to University buildings and relatively upmarket watering holes like The Royal London and Hogshead, but allow me to take you on a journey into the dark side of the area we know today as […]

    • In my first sentence in the above it should read supposition, and not superstition,

    • This was a tragic event from over 150 years ago, and with respect to the people involved we must still be careful in our superstition.

      In March of 1851 Catherine Morris had lost her child in a horrible fire, and in tragic circumstances. She was living with James Sones in Ipswich as man and wife. At the Inquest it was found that she had left her child, according to a witness, for maybe up to quarter of a hour. Further witnesses said they had heard nothing good or bad about Catherine, that Catherine was fond of the child and a good mother. Another that the parents were both fond of the child.

      The jury’s verdict was that the child was accidentally burned, but they found unanimously that Catherine was guilty of great neglect for leaving the child as described. I cannot find any evidence to say that Catherine was drunk and incapable at the time of her child’s death, or indeed that she was an alcoholic and a prostitute

    • Thank you for the information, Pedro, most appreciated, I must admit I didn’t delve into the history of the lady involved – My main aim as a Wolverhampton historian was to give an insight into the places of interest in the story published by the two gentlemen credited with writing the story.

  • Hello Sadie- Welcome to lost Wolverhampton. Yes you are correct there was a confectioner with the “Polar Bear” name next door to “Sloanes” Furnishers in Pipers Row in the 1950’s. There were also Confectioners with the same title on Snow Hill a couple of doors from the Gaumont Picture House and also one in Broad Street, almost opposite the “Vine…[Read more]

  • Have you heard the one about the lawyer and the bible? 

    Despite the set up, it is no comedy, moreover, a poignant family tale from Victorian times.

    Now I know I said in my last outing that it would be the […]

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