Billy

  • Hi, Avril Try Wolverhampton Archives address on the internet.

  • Yes, Susan Littles Lane I only remember in the 1940s. It was completely rebuilt in the late 192’s with the modern houses I think you recall.
    I remember Teddy Lane quite a size wasn’t he for that day and age. Your grandfather wasn’t by any chance “Nipper” Joyce. Please join our Facebook group where we can keep closer contact

  • Lovely memory Sadie.
    Please join our Facebook Group Lost Wolverhampton We may get a bigger response to your inquiry on there.

  • “There was no room at the Inn, for the Named and Shamed.”

    I have classified this story as unfit for under 18’s and anyone with a weak constitution as it contains scenes of Graphic Horror.

    Binge drink […]

    • Hallo Bill,
      An interesting piece as ever and plenty to comment on.
      Sad to say the The Severn Stars has followed the fate of many pubs,closed down and turned into residential accommodation. Nice place though Trysull still having two pubs, unusual for a small village. The Plough, Banks/Marstons and the Bell, Holdens of Woodsetton.

      As John Mcintyre points out everyone seems shorter than today, probably the lack of food by today’s standards. But as most of them would be flat out on the floor at some stage during the night, its all a bit academic. None were great beauties, not even the women, a bit like Kidderminster.
      Mary Ann Hughes and Ann Maria Spruce, nice pair, I’d pay to see them wrestling at the Civic on a Saturday afternoon. You say of Mrs. Spruce, she’s got more scars than a navvy, If push comes to shove my money’s on Mrs. Spruce and I’d have thought twice about asking for Mary Ann’s hand in marriage.
      Of the men, Francis Mathews stands out, a locksmith but employed by Illidge and Son, of Great Brickiln Street, where I lived in 1940, who were Brass Founders and one of the 192 bicycle makers based in Wolverhampton. I see he lived in Zoar Street, Bill is it my memory or was there a fish and chip frying range maker in Zoar Street. I have a memory in the back of mind of reading the makers name while standing waiting for my Friday nights tea.

      George Stephen Fisher stands out, a painter with one leg, not good on a ladder, only did ground floor work I would imagine. He certainly came under the description of the permanently, one leg legless.

      They all seem to have this penchant for a having a tattoo of a ladies bust or is it the bust of a lady on their forearm. One with a weakness for ladies bosoms was Stanley Winter, he had one each arm, Eagles, Snakes, Ships, Flags, Clasped Hands, a Wreath, and Two Butterfly’s but loyal and patriotic with a Tattoo of the King and Queen on his chest.

  • We hear today many convincing stories regarding the centre of town being plagued by rats in the 1940’s and 50’s.

    Now, as I have mentioned often before, I was born close to St Peter’s Church which seemed to be […]

  • Hi Kevin
    I think it must have been around 1958 at the time I came out of the forces and returned to my existing job at H. Goodhall in the Wholesale Market at that time, in Wulfruna Street.

    If I remember correctly Arthur was working for Dick Walley, a rival firm.
    He later joined the Goodall staff where he and I shared the vegetable pitch as…[Read more]

  • Hi Kevin
    Not sure of the house number, In the 20’s I would say, about four doors up from the School. Whose girls playground backed on to their garden. Your house would have been round the bend toward Eastfield Road.
    We have a Facebook Group Lost Wolverhampton Kevin please join us.

  • WOLVERHAMPTON A TALE
    OF TWO CITIES

    My pictures and stories I hope will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton at various times particularly in relation to the street scene and […]

  • Do you remember the Bluecoat School?

    Well, in this series, I hope my pictures and stories will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton since 1750, particularly in relation to the […]

  • Hi Bill nice of you to get in touch. I certainly would like to see photos of the old Market I live in Bridgnorth. But I travel to a friends print shop in Wolverhampton most days. How can we meet up The one problem is I don’t have transport. My email address is billy@lostwolverhampton.co.uk. Best Wishes. Billy H

  • Hello Ann
    Request to join our facebook group Lost Wolverhampton and put your request on there
    You will find Myself and perhaps others will find many pictures to remind you of your holiday trips including The Colonades (The Arches) as they are known.
    Best Wishes Billy.

  • Welcome to Billy’s Picture Book!

    In this new series, I hope my pictures and stories will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton since 1750, particularly in relation to the street […]

    • Hello Ann
      Request to join our facebook group Lost Wolverhampton and put your request on there
      You will find Myself and perhaps others will find many pictures to remind you of your holiday trips including The Colonades (The Arches) as they are known.
      Best Wishes Billy.

  • Hi Rosemary – All though Montrose Street was shown on the 1842 Wolverhampton Tithe Map there were only a few buildings at that time nothing much regarding housing. The slum district of Carribee was really limited to the area from Stafford Street east as far as Carbery Street (Westbury Street).

  • Thank you for the information, Pedro, most appreciated, I must admit I didn’t delve into the history of the lady involved – My main aim as a Wolverhampton historian was to give an insight into the places of interest in the story published by the two gentlemen credited with writing the story.

  • In modern times, it is home to University buildings and relatively upmarket watering holes like The Royal London and Hogshead, but allow me to take you on a journey into the dark side of the area we know today as […]

    • In my first sentence in the above it should read supposition, and not superstition,

    • This was a tragic event from over 150 years ago, and with respect to the people involved we must still be careful in our superstition.

      In March of 1851 Catherine Morris had lost her child in a horrible fire, and in tragic circumstances. She was living with James Sones in Ipswich as man and wife. At the Inquest it was found that she had left her child, according to a witness, for maybe up to quarter of a hour. Further witnesses said they had heard nothing good or bad about Catherine, that Catherine was fond of the child and a good mother. Another that the parents were both fond of the child.

      The jury’s verdict was that the child was accidentally burned, but they found unanimously that Catherine was guilty of great neglect for leaving the child as described. I cannot find any evidence to say that Catherine was drunk and incapable at the time of her child’s death, or indeed that she was an alcoholic and a prostitute

    • Thank you for the information, Pedro, most appreciated, I must admit I didn’t delve into the history of the lady involved – My main aim as a Wolverhampton historian was to give an insight into the places of interest in the story published by the two gentlemen credited with writing the story.

  • Hello Sadie- Welcome to lost Wolverhampton. Yes you are correct there was a confectioner with the “Polar Bear” name next door to “Sloanes” Furnishers in Pipers Row in the 1950’s. There were also Confectioners with the same title on Snow Hill a couple of doors from the Gaumont Picture House and also one in Broad Street, almost opposite the “Vine…[Read more]

  • Have you heard the one about the lawyer and the bible? 

    Despite the set up, it is no comedy, moreover, a poignant family tale from Victorian times.

    Now I know I said in my last outing that it would be the […]

  • “No man sympathises with the sorrows of vanity” – Samuel Johnson

    The year is 1854 and a cholera epidemic ravages the land, leading to demands for a clean water supply and proper sewage systems, especially in po […]

  • You will have to give me their names Jackie perhaps I may recall them.

  • His Name was James Gatis…
    He was a man of the people and spent all his working life in Wolverhampton fighting for the Irish immigrants of Carribee Island and the poor in other deprived areas of W […]

    • You will have to give me their names Jackie perhaps I may recall them.

    • Very interestinğ history of a log gone part of the town.Can you confirm if Montrose St was part of Carribbea İsland?

    • Hi Rosemary – All though Montrose Street was shown on the 1842 Wolverhampton Tithe Map there were only a few buildings at that time nothing much regarding housing. The slum district of Carribee was really limited to the area from Stafford Street east as far as Carbery Street (Westbury Street).

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