Billy

  • WOLVERHAMPTON A TALE
    OF TWO CITIES

    My pictures and stories I hope will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton at various times particularly in relation to the street scene and […]

  • Do you remember the Bluecoat School?

    Well, in this series, I hope my pictures and stories will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton since 1750, particularly in relation to the […]

  • Hi Bill nice of you to get in touch. I certainly would like to see photos of the old Market I live in Bridgnorth. But I travel to a friends print shop in Wolverhampton most days. How can we meet up The one problem is I don’t have transport. My email address is [email protected]. Best Wishes. Billy H

  • Hello Ann
    Request to join our facebook group Lost Wolverhampton and put your request on there
    You will find Myself and perhaps others will find many pictures to remind you of your holiday trips including The Colonades (The Arches) as they are known.
    Best Wishes Billy.

  • Welcome to Billy’s Picture Book!

    In this new series, I hope my pictures and stories will illustrate the many changes which have taken place in Wolverhampton since 1750, particularly in relation to the street […]

    • Hello Ann
      Request to join our facebook group Lost Wolverhampton and put your request on there
      You will find Myself and perhaps others will find many pictures to remind you of your holiday trips including The Colonades (The Arches) as they are known.
      Best Wishes Billy.

  • Hi Rosemary – All though Montrose Street was shown on the 1842 Wolverhampton Tithe Map there were only a few buildings at that time nothing much regarding housing. The slum district of Carribee was really limited to the area from Stafford Street east as far as Carbery Street (Westbury Street).

  • Thank you for the information, Pedro, most appreciated, I must admit I didn’t delve into the history of the lady involved – My main aim as a Wolverhampton historian was to give an insight into the places of interest in the story published by the two gentlemen credited with writing the story.

  • In modern times, it is home to University buildings and relatively upmarket watering holes like The Royal London and Hogshead, but allow me to take you on a journey into the dark side of the area we know today as […]

    • In my first sentence in the above it should read supposition, and not superstition,

    • This was a tragic event from over 150 years ago, and with respect to the people involved we must still be careful in our superstition.

      In March of 1851 Catherine Morris had lost her child in a horrible fire, and in tragic circumstances. She was living with James Sones in Ipswich as man and wife. At the Inquest it was found that she had left her child, according to a witness, for maybe up to quarter of a hour. Further witnesses said they had heard nothing good or bad about Catherine, that Catherine was fond of the child and a good mother. Another that the parents were both fond of the child.

      The jury’s verdict was that the child was accidentally burned, but they found unanimously that Catherine was guilty of great neglect for leaving the child as described. I cannot find any evidence to say that Catherine was drunk and incapable at the time of her child’s death, or indeed that she was an alcoholic and a prostitute

    • Thank you for the information, Pedro, most appreciated, I must admit I didn’t delve into the history of the lady involved – My main aim as a Wolverhampton historian was to give an insight into the places of interest in the story published by the two gentlemen credited with writing the story.

  • Hello Sadie- Welcome to lost Wolverhampton. Yes you are correct there was a confectioner with the “Polar Bear” name next door to “Sloanes” Furnishers in Pipers Row in the 1950’s. There were also Confectioners with the same title on Snow Hill a couple of doors from the Gaumont Picture House and also one in Broad Street, almost opposite the “Vine…[Read more]

  • Have you heard the one about the lawyer and the bible? 

    Despite the set up, it is no comedy, moreover, a poignant family tale from Victorian times.

    Now I know I said in my last outing that it would be the […]

  • “No man sympathises with the sorrows of vanity” – Samuel Johnson

    The year is 1854 and a cholera epidemic ravages the land, leading to demands for a clean water supply and proper sewage systems, especially in po […]

  • You will have to give me their names Jackie perhaps I may recall them.

  • His Name was James Gatis…
    He was a man of the people and spent all his working life in Wolverhampton fighting for the Irish immigrants of Carribee Island and the poor in other deprived areas of W […]

    • You will have to give me their names Jackie perhaps I may recall them.

    • Very interestinğ history of a log gone part of the town.Can you confirm if Montrose St was part of Carribbea İsland?

    • Hi Rosemary – All though Montrose Street was shown on the 1842 Wolverhampton Tithe Map there were only a few buildings at that time nothing much regarding housing. The slum district of Carribee was really limited to the area from Stafford Street east as far as Carbery Street (Westbury Street).

  • Yes, Marlene, just one of a dozen or so beerhouses in Canal Street in the mid-1800’s an F. Spencer was the licensee at the Dog & Partridge in 1868.

  • An Island Far Away?
    Despite sounding somewhat similar to the Caribbean Islands, the area of Wolverhampton City Centre once known as “Carribee Island” was no place in the sun!

    “CRIBBEY – ISLAND”  the place was […]

    • When my ancestors came over from Ireland during the famine, they came to Wolverhampton. Honoria Beattie gave birth to a son in the yard of the Dog and Partridge in Canal St.

      • Yes, Marlene, just one of a dozen or so beerhouses in Canal Street in the mid-1800’s an F. Spencer was the licensee at the Dog & Partridge in 1868.

    • If I may, I have recently published a book via YouCaxton of Oxford and Shrewsbury, called ‘Ironopolis – Standing Up For Wolverhampton’ – part of it is about analysing the ‘original Black Country’, but there are also detailed sections on Caribee Island and other sections of the town such as its very own ‘east end’ at Horsley Fields (the second’e’ was not used as in Horseley back then) and Monmore Green. In the 1800s Caribee Island was infamous and there are many reports about its appalling conditions gleaned from newspaper archives.

      There are also detailed sections about coal-mining in the town (yes there was a lot of it), and also its vast iron industry. Around 500 pages in all, so it is quite detailed.

      It is available from Amazon, though also I have some copies I am happy to deliver for free in the Wolverhampton area for a reduced £12. If you would like a copy, pls email me on [email protected]

  • No, Martin, I played right back, can’t ever remember scoring a goal We played our home matches then on the Recreation Ground on Red Hill Street, the clinic was probably built on there when you were at Red Cross Street.

  • Thanks for getting in touch Martin – Whites Field on the Cannock Road was St Peters and Pauls regular football pitch in the 1947-48 Season – I played against them for Red Cross Street – on a Saturday morning the score 1-1.

  • One of the most personal decisions in a person’s life is the nature of what happens to them once they shuffle from this mortal coil. In present times, many people choose cremation over burial, partly due to its m […]

    • Love that old photograph of Lower Stafford street. And a great story too.

  • I would try the Tipton Library Helen They are sure to be able to help you.

  • So right John, sorry if I, implied it did.
    So now I reckon I shall have to do a sequel from the Mitre to the Old barrel on the east side, and the Red House down to Boots Chemist on the west side.

    Anyway, thanks for the comment always appreciated.

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