Lost Wolverhampton is now on the "MAP"

Frontpage Forum People & Places of Wolverhampton Lost Wolverhampton is now on the "MAP"

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    • #5208

      Billy

      Participant

      J.S.Map 1884

      Below the old cellar head.

    • #5209

      Billy

      Participant

      Davids continuing interest in Stafford Street on his facebook group, has brought about a lot of comments regarding the whereabouts of the slum area once known as Carribee Islands.

      Well let me map it out for you.

      CARRIBBEE NOW

      The area between Stafford Street, Littles lane and Canal Street was for many years known as Caribbee Islands

      During the 1840’s and 50’s Wolverhampton offered a lifeline to those facing starvation in Ireland as the result of the terrible Potato famine, and during these years the town saw a great influx of Irish Families.

      Many ended up in this area between Stafford Street and the canal, and by 1851, out of an overall population of nearly 50 thousand, over 6,000 were Irish.

      At first it was mostly young single men looking for work that came taking mainly labouring jobs in Iron works, on farms or in mines and when the womenfolk came over they usually found work as servants, or lodging house keepers

      With so many families now settled in the town, Catholic schools were needed for the children. the first one being built in littles lane in 1849 S.S. Patrick and George.

      For the Irish community life was tough and often violent and disease ridden.,Typhoid and Cholera were rife in Carribbee Island and the mortality rate was high.

      IN 1843 a public report outlined the squalid and unsanitary conditions endured by many poor Irish families and local Doctor, James Gatis wrote a letter to the chronicle in disgust stating nothing had been done to eradicate the evil conditions.

      No wonder that there were so many cases of fever especially Typhus fever.

      In 1849 Robert Rawlinson produced a damning report that would eventually lead to improvements in the towns public health and in the late 1880’s with the coming of the Artisans dwelling act the whole area of Carribbee islands was demolished and rebuilt

      Below the old cellar head.

    • #5210

      Billy

      Participant

      Emma Mac asks:

      Have you got any maps or photographs of the back to back houses in Merridale Street Wolverhampton c1924?

      This small section of Merridale Street, I have placed here is the short piece from Worcester Street to Graisley Street. Because I find this section the most interesting bit of what was a lengthy Street.

      I don’t think Wolverhampton had many back to back houses such as Birmingham But we had many courts, and you can see them on here in abundance.

      Merridale St 1920

      If you wish to look at a complete picture of the houses in Merridale Street , Wolverhampton Archives is the place to go Please ask for the ordnance survey map relevant to the date you want.

      If I can help you or other members with further information regarding this map, feel free to ask.

      Below the old cellar head.

    • #5307

      Billy

      Participant

      Katie Goode recalls Camp Street shortly before its demise. Do You!

      CampSt 2

      Below the old cellar head.

    • #5308

      MaggieH

      Participant

      I remember Merridale Street well – although it was in fact the part known as Merridale Street West. So probably not the section you particularly refer to.  My auntie Vera lived at 137. In fact she was not an actual relation, but a good friend of my mum. Vera and Len Morrell. 137 was a few houses up from the Owen Road end of Merridale st West.  We were in touch until a couple of Christmasses ago.

    • #5309

      Billy

      Participant

      Yes maggie I see Len and Vera were still there in the 1960’s Merridale Street and Great Brickkiln Street were probably two of the longest Streets in those days .

      Below the old cellar head.

    • #5310

      MaggieH

      Participant

      Yes, they were still there then.  I am not sure when Len passed away (my mum moved to the west country in the late sixties) but Vera was still there quite recently. I last visited her in about 1990, but have continued exchanging Christmas cards, and receiving one too, up until about two years ago – so either she was still living there or was getting her mail forwarded, as I don’t have another address.

    • #5314

      MaggieH

      Participant

      ps – Fascinated to see that a corner of Bishop Street is showing on your map, Billy. My mum grew up in Bishop Street, but it had gone by the time I was old enough to take notice.

    • #5375

      Billy

      Participant

      Allan recalls Newbolds Farm on our facebook group

      Before we finish on Newbolds Farm I would just like to add a little further information regarding this ancient farm for members who may not recal its location.It once covered an area of almost 100 acres between Bushbury Road, Victoria Road ,Thorneycroft lane and Prestwood Road . Up the Cannock Road as far as Mill Lane. As Allan said the last owner was James Cope and it was sold circa 1916 here is a copy of the sales plan from that year.

      NEWBOLDS FARM

      Below the old cellar head.

    • #5376

      Billy

      Participant

      Alan enquires about the line of the proposed railway across Old Fallings.

      Hi billy whats that north western railway,,,,,a road or a track,,,,,,,

      Billy :
      I think Alan, it was a line that never came off.

      It was started as the London & North Western Cannock Chase Branch Railway.

      The 1860s saw the up and coming age of the Railway locomotive and there were numerous collieries in production all over Cannock Chase who were keen to adopt this new form of rapid transport for their products.

      Plans were submitted to Parliament by the Cannock Chase and Wolverhampton Railway Company suggesting a railway from the north side of Chasewater to a junction with the Great Western Railway just to the north of Wolverhampton Low Level.
      The only section of this railway that was built was the section now in use by Chasewater Railway which conjoined along the Reservoir’s south shore with the Midland Railway and the London & North Western Railway.

      Below the old cellar head.

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