"SCHOOLDAYS" are the happiest days

Frontpage Forum People & Places of Wolverhampton "SCHOOLDAYS" are the happiest days

This topic contains 26 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Colin James 1 year, 3 months ago.

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  • #5112


    Billy

    Participant

    BILLYS FIRST SCHOOL

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5118


    Billy

    Participant

    St Josephs 1949

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5119


    Billy

    Participant

    I noticed today there had been 50 or more comments posted on Facebook Wolverhampton Past & Present regarding St Josephs R.C. Secondary Modern School, Adelaide Street, off Steelhouse Lane.

    Now this was a school I am very aquainted with.

    St Josephs was my former senior school from 1948-52. and I have many good memories and many sad ones during my time there.
    The above photo is Mr McVeighs class of 1949, I am the tall chap at the back.

    As you can see not many of the pupils could afford the School blazer then, but a little later Caps would become a must have. Does anyone recall our school tailors Albert Williams.then on Snow Hill.

    Below the old cellar head.

    • #5121


      shrewsburywolf

      Participant

      Billy

      I’m still looking for any photos of Joey’s – only one found so far is the side view from Adelaide Street/Steelhouse Lane junction which was from the archives site. Any ideas where we can find more?

      Terry

  • #5122


    Billy

    Participant

    ST JOSEPHS
    WHERE EDUCATION WAS HAMMERED IN TO YOU IN THE DAYS JUST AFTER THE WAR.

    Mr Morgan Headmaster, MrMcVeigh, Mr Kilboy, Mr Critchlow, Mr Gorman, Mr MacDonaugh, Mr Ashcroft, Mr Colman, Mr Green, Mr Potts teachers from the early 1950’s That signed the school newsletter “The Cable”

    Cable. 1953

    Below the old cellar head.

    • #5125


      shrewsburywolf

      Participant

      Billy

      Some of those teacher’s names are familiar to me – McDonagh, Coleman (metalwork teacher, a tough guy and remembered for his trusted ally, Lucifer – his cane), Vincent Green (who I believe passed away only a year or so back).

      I started at Joey’s the year after Mr Morgan retired in 1963, Mr O. D. Pass was head during my 5 years at the school.

      Terry

    • #5126


      shrewsburywolf

      Participant

      Billy Some of those teacher’s names are familiar to me – McDonagh, Coleman (metalwork teacher, a tough guy and remembered for his trusted ally, Lucifer – his cane), Vincent Green (who I believe passed away only a year or so back). I started at Joey’s the year after Mr Morgan retired in 1963, Mr O. D. Pass was head during my 5 years at the school. Terry

  • #5127


    shrewsburywolf

    Participant

    Billy

    It’s quite true life was very disciplined and strict at Joey’s, I had the stick on numerous occasions for various misdemeanours but most of us were taught very well by some very good teachers, I certainly came away from there being numerate, literate, knew right from wrong and had respect for others.

    I will also be forever grateful to a Mr Evans, he was our music teacher who introduced us to the delights of classical music: Chopin, Beethoven, Mozart and who seemed to be his particular favourite, Sibelius.

    Doubtless there will be many of my contemporaries who will disagree with my appreciation of Mr Evans’ attempts to educate us about music … But hey ho!

  • #5129


    Billy

    Participant

    Terry in my years at St Josephs Mr Ashcroft doubled up as Woodwork teacher and music teacher.
    He put on Gilbert & Sullivan shows every other year,

    The lads did HMS Pinafore , Pirates of Penzance and Patience while I was there.
    Can you imagine that with not a girl in sight. What do you think that did to our Street cred.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5131


    Billy

    Participant

    Boxers

    Mind you if you asked any of these old boys from the 1950’s They would tell you they could box a bit.
    The teachers are on the left Mr Colman Metal work teacher (Boxing coach)
    On the right Mr Morgan Headmaster.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5139


    shrewsburywolf

    Participant

    Wow – not sure if I’ve seen this pic before, Mr Coleman is very recognisable, although in my days he was much thinner on top!

    Were the 2 Mr O’Shea’s there during your time, they weren’t related – Mr J. O’Shea was the elder, an Irishman who taught English! He could, at times, be a little grumpy and we lads used to wind him up into a fury.

    The other was Mr M. O’Shea, known to generations of Joey’s boys as ‘The Weed’, he taught maths and occasionally took us for football. He could push, kick and shove anyone but God forbid any boy who kicked him back – I did!

    Both the O’Sheas were characters and really good teachers, never to be forgotten.

    • #6227


      Colin James

      Participant

      Hi Billy…….the guy in the centre of the photo holding the cup, im proud to say is my dad, Colin Valentine James…….He does know the names of some of the other guys which I will get and forward them on to you……..many thanks Colin C James

  • #5143


    Billy

    Participant

    More facts and tit-bits regarding St Josephs

    ST JOSEPH’S – NOTES

    SCHOOL FOUNDED IN 1868, (

    Moved to From East Street to Adelaide Street in 1914
    Became a senior boys’ school in September 1934
    Became a Secondary Modern School for boys’ in 1944

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5144


    Billy

    Participant

    A Letter written by E Lloyd Morgan Headmaster 1953.

    Headmasters Notes 1953

    Today we live in a world, were the air is fraught with change; old values have gone; old ideas and customs are in the melting pot, and new ones are challenging their places.

    The people in the world, are for the most part, the instrument of state policy. Even in settled and victorious countries like our own, their is evidence in plenty, of restlessness and a desire to regain many lost freedoms.

    This age presents a challenge to us as teachers, for never let it be forgotten, that it is upon the Teachers, that the main burden of building the new world will fall, for it is upon the education of the children the whole life of the community depends.

    Nobody enters the teaching profession in order to gain riches . It is a calling which appeals most to those, who most desire to serve their generation .
    Our task is an onerous one, but I am confident that the prevailing note of all of us is one of courage, rather than despondency and our response to the challenge of the age, will lead to success and victory.

    A Teacher, who must of necessity, be always looking to the future, and who so seldom see the direct result of his labour’s, and for the most part never is rewarded by their recognition, needs faith above all qualities except perhaps the kindred quality of patience .
    Magna est veritas et prevalebit. that is the motto inscribed in secret on the heart of every true member of the teaching profession; it is certainly the spirit of St Joseph’s

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5145


    Billy

    Participant

    THE SCHOOL SONG

    The School Song

    The battle for life is the sternest strife,
    The boy becomes the man;
    Here we are learning the lessons of life,
    Just do the best you can.
    Sing, boys, sing, with a lilt and a swing,
    The fame of Saint Joseph’s School;
    In chorus clear let your voices ring,
    God Bless the dear old School.

    Our Holy Faith goes deep in the past,
    Grip hard that anchor strong;
    In sun and in storm, from first to last,
    We shall never go far wrong.
    Sing, boys, sing, with a lilt and a swing,
    The fame of Saint Joseph’s School;
    In chorus clear let your voices ring,
    God Bless the dear old School.

    Then work, boys work, no duty shirk,
    Soon come the test to all;
    Shun the sins that in darkness lurk,
    Stand fast and meet the call;
    Sing, boys, sing, with a lilt and a swing,
    The fame of Saint Joseph’s School;
    In chorus clear let your voices ring,
    God Bless the dear old School.

    Be true be brave, to the weak be kind,
    That’s the spirit that makes the man;
    And when we leave the School behind,
    We’ll be proud of St: Joseph’s clan.
    Sing, boys, sing, with a lilt and a swing,
    The fame of Saint Joseph’s School;
    In chorus clear let your voices ring,
    God Bless the dear old School.

    Below the old cellar head.

    • #5154


      shrewsburywolf

      Participant

      Billy

      First time I’ve seen those school song lyrics, can’t remember it being sung during my time.

      Sing boys sing, with a lilt and a swing!

      The mind boggles.

      Terry

  • #5146


    Billy

    Participant

    If there is anyone who doesn’t know the location of St Josephs School here is the 1950’s plan

    plan St Josephs

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5196


    Billy

    Participant

    All of these young ladies must be in their seventies now, It would be a special treat for me if someone recognised themselves.
    March 16 at 9:21am · Like

    Shirley Preston I was there ’64 – ’68. Good school
    Shirley Preston’s photo.
    March 16 at 12:47pm · Like · 1

    Emmie Benbow My dad was there around 1940 – 43 I think. I know it was the war years and he left at 14. He was born 1929, sadly passed away 1994,
    March 17 at 2:43pm · Lik

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5201


    Billy

    Participant

    We have today to Welcome John Thixton our new member from Bilgola, Australia.

    Jon say’s:
    Thanks for adding me. I was born in Low Hill in 1932, attended Oldfallings Junior school and St Chad’s College leaving in 1948 when my family emigrated to Rhodesia. Went to university in South Africa, worked in Zambia before moving to Australia, My elder brother Derek who attended The Technical High school unfortunately died last year in Zimbabwe. Wonder if there are members of this group who knew us?

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5202


    Billy

    Participant

    No sooner had John put his pen down our dear friend John Favil in Winsconsin USA, was quick of the mark with thia reply.

    John, I am so sorry to hear of the passing of Derek who was a class member with me first at the Intermediate and then the Technical High School when it changed curriculum in 1944 and he like me chose Engineering. I for one welcome you to this group as I am sure you will find subjects of interest to remind you of Lost Wolverhampton and our shared memories guided as we are excellently by Billy and Daniel Howe.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5203


    Billy

    Participant

    Michael, Derek, John

    Fortunately I had decided to visit Africa on my way to Europe in June last year in order to see Derek. This picture was taken at Harare airport just before I left in mid June. The 3rd person in the picture on the left is younger brother Mike, also born in Wolverhampton (16 Copes Crescent, Newbold Estate) in 1942 during the war. This is probably the last picture of Derek before he died in August.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5204


    Billy

    Participant

    Oldfallings Hall

    Early Notes
    An attractive and Historical COUNTRY MANSION formerley the residence of the Gough family built about the reign of Charles I; with facade and staircase added about the reign of Queen Anne.The gardens enlarged and improved by the present owner (SIR RICHARD PAGET, BART,)
    .
    The house is approached from Oldfallings lane by two carriage drives with one entrance Lodge a total of 11 acres 1 rood 9 and a quarter perches.

    In 1916 the hall was offered for sale by the Paget family, and was finally sold in 1925 and became St Chad’s College a Catholic boys school until 1977, when its status changed to a mixed comprehensive school.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5288


    Billy

    Participant

    WOBASTON

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5289


    Billy

    Participant

    I would think there are many older Wulfrunians who lived in the vicinity of Marsh Lane, Fordhouses around 1964 when this photo was taken remember it as
    Wobaston Secondary School.

    In the foreground though is a sculptured pillar designed and executed by J.Paddison.
    Can you recall what the name given to the sculpture.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5297


    Billy

    Participant

    WOBASTON

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5625


    Billy

    Participant

    Part of Philip Barnands Most interesting comment.

    I do not recall your wife’s name, though of course I was a pupil at Woden R’oad Infants and Junior school. I may have started a bit late, at the age of 5 in September 1944, because I had some catching-up to do, eventually becoming the youngest in my year. One of our class photos appeared in the Black Country Bugle.

    I think Swinford Road had semi-detached houses? A sure sign of affluence! Does your wife remember the Blood family, whom I think lived in Stratton Street, maybe Prosser Street? They were a large family and Mrs Blood seemed to be permanently pregnant. I once embarrassed my mother in Bray’s Park Village butcher’s shop, when I asked her why Mrs Blood’s tummy was so big. I was told to keep quiet!

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5626


    Billy

    Participant

    Hi Phil
    Woden Road circa 1950? My wife isn’t on this photo but my cousin Janet Nickolds from Old fallings is.

    Recognise anyone?

    Janet Woden Road

    Below the old cellar head.

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