"TIME GENTLEMEN PLEASE" Public Houses remembered

Frontpage Forum People & Places of Wolverhampton "TIME GENTLEMEN PLEASE" Public Houses remembered

This topic contains 27 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Malaga 8 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #5136


    Billy

    Participant

    Last Orders Please

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5137


    Billy

    Participant

    Memories of the days before “Wetherspoons”

    Ms Ida Raytree Lowbridge writes on Facebook Wolverhampton Past & Present

    Hi there,has anyone got any old pictures of the new inns pub in salon street,as this is where my dad lived xxxthanx in advance xx

    New Inn-Salop st

    The tall building to the left of the 1930’s block which still exist on the corner of Salop Street and School Street. Was the New Inn pictured just after the war.
    This older building was replaced in 1961 by a more modernistic effort and it wonderful older facade destroyed.

    If indeed if the ladies name before marriage is Lowbridge I am sure I will be able to add to this thread.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5147


    Billy

    Participant

    During a conversation today on the sad demise of the old “Bushbury Arms” at Showell Circus, I was asked when was it built?.

    Well I have a little story of how the license was obtained for the late hostelry in the late 1920’s which I would like to share with you.

    Bushbury arms small

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5150


    Billy

    Participant

    The following photograph of Market Street dated around 1922, was taken looking up from Princes Street with Queens Street Congregational Church on the left which now of course has been replaced by a job centre.

    On the opposite side of market Street, immediately behind the policeman,was Briggs and co, boot factors, on the corner of little Queen Street ,
    Next door was W.J. Rawlins Hairdressers & masseurs, (soon to re-move into Queen Street).

    Then next on the left was Paleman & co, manufacturer of art & needlework and ladies and children’s underclothes.

    *Then the lady with the bicycle is standing outside the premises -with the large gates originally belonging to Mottrams Wolverhampton Brewery – whom incidentally in 1851, were offering there strongest ale, at one shilling and sixpence a gallon, or 8p in todays money.

    At this time it belonged to the Old Wolverhampton brewery.

    ALHAMBRA small

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5151


    Billy

    Participant

    The large gates front the entrance to Ben Hadley’s yard and stables. He was a Horse dealer and licensee in 1922.
    And for a little while longer he and his wife will be mine hosts at here the “Alhambra Inn” next door. for brewery owner Frank Myatt.

    Five years after this photograph was taken the evening publication of the Express & Star Monday June 27th 1927, related to fact of the passing of the Old Alhambra, popularly, known as Wolverhampton’s Rendezvous of the “Profession”

    It went on to say; ”The ‘Alhambra Inn’ Market Street is due to come down with the street widening scheme .

    It mentioned its historic past, when the old “Theatre Royal” stood on the site now occupied by the library,on Snow Hill, and the Alhambra was the snug and companionable house close by, that became the resort of “professional’ people and has remained so until this day. (this day being 27th June 1927)

    For 25 years the licensee’s, Mr and Mrs Ben Hadley, have proved popular figures among theatrical and music-hall people visiting Wolverhampton.

    An extensive gallery of signed photographs of stage personalities adorned the walls of the Alhambra, among them are those of Dan Leno, and Miss Marie Lloyd, and many more actors, actresses and music hall stars, retain happy recollections of the old Alhambra, the licence of which, will be now transferred to the Bushbury arms, Low Hill.

    The large building seen in the background I believe to be the old “Smithfield Brewery” as this area was once known and shown on the map of 1870.
    * Castle Yard, which as we know is still there alongside Marks & Spencer, was at the side of the Alhambra, and the name came from the ‘Castle Inn’ which up until the late 1820’s was immediatly behind it at one time in Dudley Street.

    The name ”Castle” later carried on in the form of a new public House sited at the top of Tower Street opposite the Wheatsheaf, and it is shown on the map of 1870.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5153


    Billy

    Participant

    My good friend Don Bradley on facebook wonders if anyone frequented the old long gone Molineux Billiard Hall, at the side of the Molineux Hotel.

    I have memories as a young 14 year old climbing that flight of wooden stairs
    in the early 1950’s.

    Don seems to think the hall was licensed I don’t think it was perhaps some member possibly as long in the tooth as Don and I, can enlighten us.

    Billiard Hall

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5252


    Billy

    Participant

    Please note this recent article appeared in the monthly “Sons of Suction” magazine.

    Bridgnorth Publicans have been urged not to offer Ralph, any more drinks. due to the fact of him leaving his mark on every doorstep and plant container from High Street down Cartway to riverside.

    Quiz pics6

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5271


    Billy

    Participant

    Probably one of the first adverts placed by the propritors of the “Wheatsheaf” Public House – mid 1800’s

    WHEATSHEAF

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5278


    Billy

    Participant

    John Lloyd comments:
    Nice pic Gill, I think that’s when it was on the other side of the road

    



Rob Williams comments:
    
Could Have Sworn The Present Day Pub Built On Same Spot About 1950?

    Well John It was – The older pictures placed by you and Gill shows the early Pear Tree on the same side of the Cannock Road as it is today.
But there was a Pear Tree Inn on the Underhill side of the Cannock Road at least 200 hundred years ago

    Rob here is a picture of The Pear Tree you recall built circa 1937.

    PEAR TREE 1939

    Below the old cellar head.

    • #7631


      Malaga

      Participant

      Thanks Billy,John Very Interesting Read re The Pear Tree Pub.

      Regards

      Rob Williams.

  • #5279


    Billy

    Participant

    Ask your parents or elder siblings were this pub sign was in Wolverhampton certainly up to the 1950’s.

    A bottle of Black Satin to the first lady or gent that gives me the correct name and location.

    Unicorn

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5280


    tonydavies

    Participant

    Would this have anything to do with the Unicorn in Oxley Street?

  • #5281


    Billy

    Participant

    You have it in one tony,the only licensed house to my knowledge known as The Unicorn in Wolverhampton, was half way down the north side of Oxley Street.

    Most of North side, of Oxley Street went under the hammer in the late 50’s early 60’s and the new North Road Working Mens Club was built on the site.

    My uncle Sam Docherty used the Unicorn and I recall being in the bar with my father on Christmas day lunchtime 1950. I was a tall 13yr old at the time.

    I recall admiring this gents colourful tie, he noticed this and promply took it of and gave it to me.
    I have fond memories of my one and only visit to the “Unicorn”.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5282


    Billy

    Participant

    Keeping with memories of Oxley Street,here is an post I received awhile back from Norman a highly regard contributor to Lost Wolverhampton.

    I was born 9th April 1929 at number 13 Oxley Street which went from North Road to Waterloo Road. My Grandma named Barrs ran a general shop at 33 Oxley St. until she was nearly 90.
    This was next to the Unicorn Inn, an Ansells House.

    I went to school at Red Cross Street Infants and then Junior and finished up at the Intermediate School in Old Hall Street.

    I remember a Co-op shop on the corner of North Rd./Oxley St. but this previously belonged to the Hand family who lived in an adjoining house.

    One of my schoolmates from Red Cross St. was Leslie Pritchard whose parents ran a second hand shop in Stafford Street, opposite Littles Lane (and Copes Motor Cycle shop).
    I can still remember us careering down Littles Lane on a home made buggy! We certainly had plenty of local characters around the area, one who comes to mind was Harry Lomas whose house was actually in LOMAS St.

    Harry used to go round selling fresh milk from churns on his milk float handcart and always had jokes and strange tales to relate.

    Am enjoying the site immensely.
    Norman

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5286


    Billy

    Participant

    For the younger generation who are unsure were Oxley Street is today, I am pleased to be able to show (albeit in its modernistic style,) still standing proudly on its North Street corner today, has it has done for well over a Century and a half “The Hatherton Inn” North Road

    Hatherton today

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5298


    Billy

    Participant

    Not much to go on here just the chimney pots. Nevertheless they top the roof of a popular Wolverhampton Public House.

    chimney pots

    To easy isn’t it

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5301


    tonydavies

    Participant

    As you say Billy, too easy. Anyone with a knowledge of  “God’s Wonderful Railway” and where  solar energy comes from should get it, but I’ll give someone else a chance of jumping in with the answer!!

  • #5303


    Billy

    Participant

    Thanks Tony – It is as John andkim agree The Great Western in the 1970’s an M & B house at that time.

    Great Western

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5330


    Billy

    Participant

    Yes of course it is “The Great Western” Sun Street, Wolverhampton.

    Great Western

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5332


    Billy

    Participant

    What is the name and Where is this Public House building situated.

    what pub

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5400


    Billy

    Participant

    The New Hotel on the corner of Johns Lane and Victoria Street was a famous Coaching House built in 1921

    New Hotel

    This is a poor photo taken in the late 1950’s It was most unfortunate this historic building like many others of the same ilk bit the dust in the 1960’s.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5404


    tonydavies

    Participant

    I’d put a time of the early 1960’s on the picture Billy. You can just make out a Triumph Vitesse turning into the street. The Vitesse started production in 1962 and ran until 1971. That probably makes this one of the last photos taken of the New Hotel before it was demolished. In fact, looking at the pic more closely, it looks as though the upper windows are already out and the demolition process has already started!

  • #5409


    Billy

    Participant

    You are absolutely correct with the date Tony.

    The poor picture below shows it a little while later from another angle when its well into its demise.

    New Hotel demise

    I can recall my last visit to this once popular house ,it was about this tome 1964.

    Banks’s at that time hoping to hang on to the licence of the New Hotel had built a temporary portable building on the waste ground here on the corner of Bell Street, once occupied by Don Everall.

    I recall the evening of my last visit vividly.

    My father and I had been to the Odeon across the road in Skinner Street to see William Holden in “The Wild Bunch” Dad loved a Western almost as much as having a pint.

    After ten O’clock I noticed he kept looking at the time and at twenty past ten , he turned to me and said; Billy, If you don’t mind I’ve seen enough Mexicans shot. Can we go for a pint at the New Hotel.
    Which we did.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5410


    tonydavies

    Participant

    Interesting to see, in the second picture, as one building comes down, another rises in the background. Mander House is still under construction at this time as can be seen by the crane and scaffolding. We lost many of our old buildings for the construction of what I personally look on as an abhorrence on our landscape. As a shopping centre it’s just about acceptable but, a<span class=”entry”><span class=”entry-body”><span class=”runon-head”><span class=”runon-title” title=”Derived word”><span class=”w”>rchitecturally</span></span></span></span></span>, so much more could have been done to meld it into it’s surroundings more sympathetically. The loss of the Star and Garter in Victoria Street and Central Arcade was hard enough to take, but did it have to be replaced with acres of concrete? There are examples of what could have been achieved, with a little imagination, on the Penn Road and Tettenhall Road where the facades of blocks of terraced houses have been kept and new housing built onto the back, thus giving the appearence of well looked after old properties but with all modern facilities available to prospective buyers. All it takes is a little imagination!

    OK! Rant over! How do others feel?

  • #5514


    Billy

    Participant

    We received this enquiry today from Ms Helen Springthorpe.

    I am really pleased I came across your information on The Heath, I am researching The Travellers Rest Inn, Deans Heath Road, where my Grandad Bertie Springthorpe was born in 1901. His parents Edward and Rose ran this pub and I am desperately trying to find anyone who knew the area. He actually married in 1926 and moved to Sedgley, I am hoping to find a photograph or an idea of what the street was like, or when it was demolished. Can you help me please??
    Helen

    Hello Helen glad you found the story “On the Heath” interesting.

    Now you mention, Deans Heath Road . I personally have never come across a street/road with that name.
    Deans Road and Old Heath Road are still there today on route from Wednesfield Road to Willenhall Road.
    I doubt though wether either contained a public house called the Travellers Rest.
    It could be you are referring to The travellers Rest, Wolverhampton Road, Heath Town, just a few doors away from Woden Road..
    Demolished in the late 1960’s with the Heath Town transformation.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5516


    Billy

    Participant

    The “Travellers Rest” Wolverhampton Road Heath Town pictured Late 1960’s

    Travellors Rest

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5661


    Billy

    Participant

    THE NEW HOTEL

    In the 1820’s The New Hotel was built on the corner of Johns Lane and Cock Street to cater for the ever increasing Coach Trade at that time with the opening of Telfords new cutting through the Rock at Tettenhall.

    It is seen above some 140 years later.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5663


    Billy

    Participant

    Refresh Rooms

    The Market hall Refreshment Room pictured in the late 1800’s. Mrs Hinds who managed the refreshment rooms for more than 60 years is seen with members of her staff. In those days Dinners were offered for 4d, 5d, 6d,and 7d.!.

    I don’t suppose there are any old patrons left who perhaps in 1901,had a quiet 4d meal and a pint after the gathering in the Square for Queen Victoria’s funeral

    But there are still many about who will still recall those heady day’s of 1953 enjoying their breakfast or lunch, when the Market was gaily decorated out for its Centenary and also the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth.

    Below the old cellar head.

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