"WOLVES" live in my Playground

Frontpage Forum People & Places of Wolverhampton "WOLVES" live in my Playground

This topic contains 10 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Billy 3 years, 7 months ago.

  • Author

    Posts

  • #5113


    Billy

    Participant

    Billy in shelter

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5114


    Billy

    Participant

    An enquiry from Mark Cooper a keen follower of the “Wolves”

    Hi Billy,

    Can you help me please.   Where was the “Windmill” situated on Goldthorn Hill and where was the Windmill field, the playing field used by the Wolves before their move to the current pitch? 

    Iv’e been reading the amazing book by Patrick A. Quirke  “The Origins of Wolverhampton Wanderers” and found it a great read. You may know of it too.

    And is the house belonging to Sir Alfred Hickman still standing on Goldthorn Hill.

    Had you thought of doing a “Wolves Walk” around the stadium and along the Dudley Road,  Kings Arms, etc.  I think this would be a good idea, if you have the time.

    What do you think?

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5115


    Billy

    Participant

    Hi Mark perhaps these few facts from my slideshow “The Early Wolves” may help you here.

    THE WHEREABOUTS OF WINDMILL FIELD

    As you can imagine the area around Goldthorn Hill would have been mostly farmland at the time the Wolves came to be St Lukes Church and schools weren’t built until 1861.
    At around this time John Bayton.an original Wolves team player came with his family to “Lodge Farm” Goldthorn Hill.

    The Wolves then known as St Lukes was formed in 1876, and first field the club used was owned by Mrs Baynton situated opposite Stroud’s Niphon Works. ( Probably this was Windmill Field now occupied by housing but the works building still stands. opposite)

    In 1878 Mrs Baynton gave up the farm and St Lukes lost their pitch. not being able to rent another they could afford In 1879 they joined forces with with the Wolverhampton Wanderers cricket Club, and shared their ground on the Dudley road, .

    The club, as the result became known as Wolverhampton Wanderers Cricket and Football Club.
    In time the cricket section was dropped and the club was henceforth named Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5116


    Billy

    Participant

    REGARDING THE GOLDTHORN WINDMILL

    Mill House plan

    The Plan showing the position of the Goldthorn Windmill dated 1906

    Running across the bottom of the plan is Goldthorn Road
    Running across the top is Upper Villiers Street.
    Both roads joining Goldthorn Hill on the right.

    To the left of Chetwynd Road at the end of a passage way known as 12 yard road.stood The Mill House and Ivy Cottage all part of the estate for sale Lot 7

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5117


    Billy

    Participant

    Goldthorn Windmill 1

    This is the site of Goldthorn Windmill
    A windmill is shown roughly in this position on a map in 1682. It was a tower mill built of brick on top of which sat a roof or cap which could be turned so the sails would turn in the wind.

    This photo shows the windmill in the 20th century before it was demolished

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5120


    MaggieH

    Participant

    Hello Billy – interesting topic. St Luke’s junior school certainly still had use of a sports field off Upper Villiers Street in the nineteen-fifties.  It was accessed along a narrow side road a short way uphill from the gate of the Sunbeam works.  I have an idea the side road may have been only partly made-up.  I attended the school between ’55 and ’59 and we used to walk up the hill for games on this field – possibly a remnant of a larger one. I also remember sports days,  with coloured bands of tape to show our team or ‘house’, never being quite fast enough to be in the first three, and tripping over in giggles in the three-legged race.

  • #5178


    Billy

    Participant

    Yes Maggie there were playing fields as I recall in between Goldthorn Road and Upper Villiers Street in the 1950’s. Would you have gone up Cyprus Street to them.

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5195


    Billy

    Participant

    Wolves Cups

    Terry Barlow Commented

    C’mon Me Babbies – this the first Wolves side that I became aware of, containing the names of legends that made Wolverhampton Wanderers great. Where do we start: Billy Wright the best captain we’ve ever had, Peter Broadbent – arguably the greatest ever Wolf, Bill Slater, Ron Flowers …. We could go and and on
    March 2 at 8:08pm · Edited · Like · 1

    David Harrington Commented

    Thanks for the welcome everyone. Wolves still a chance to go up if a few things go their way. Losing so many games in a row late last year didn’t help. Found a plastic mounted football card of Billy Wright in a little second hand store on the NSW Central Coast. I thought it was an extraordinary find considering the location and Wolves not being a fashionable team to follow. Anyway good luck for me.
    March 2 at 10:16pm · Like

    Anthony Collins commented

    Last season we had to start at the bottom, i have faith with a little bit of luck we could be celebrating again. Up the WOLVES.
    March 31 at 12:05pm · Like

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5247


    Billy

    Participant

    And can you believe it The Wolves were born here at St Lukes.

    1876 Poster

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5429


    Billy

    Participant

    Stafford Road was “THE TEAM OF THE TOWN” in 1881 founded in 1872, and connected with the GWR Stafford Road works. The Wolves when still at Dudley Road in 1883, beat them 5-1 The rest is History

    Fallowfield

    Ten years later they won the English Cup at Fallowfield beating Everton 1-0

    Below the old cellar head.

  • #5565


    Billy

    Participant

    The full – Backs Alf Crook, Roy Pritchard, Laurie Kelly and Terry Springthorpe, pose with their Captain in front of the coach about to take the Wolves Cup winning side to the reception at the Town Hall – 1949

    WOLVES 49 jpg

    An excerpt from a slide show I do entitled Wolves Cup Run of 1949.

    Up to this point in time Wolves had beaten Chesterfield 6-0 in the third round, on January 8th. and with further victories over Sheffield Utd, Liverpool and West Brom, they were now drawn against the Cup-holders Manchester Utd, in the Semi-final.

    The odds were well against Wolves from the start, and as the game progressed their task seemed impossible. Jesse Pye, still suffering from a bout of flu was playing well below par. and Roy Pritchard our left back had to be substituted to the left wing, being injured after only six minutes,

    Against the run of the play we scored, but they quickly equalised, then with the score one each, and half an hour to play, Laurie Kelly was so badly injured he had to be stretchered off . ( and remember no substitutions in those days).
    But then much to everyone’s surprise a few minutes later, he hobbled back on to the field. and carried on, and although in great pain,
    It was said, that evening in the local newspaper, “his extra effort gave Wolves, the strength to keep the United at bay throughout the ninety minutes and extra time, and earned them a well deserved replay.
    The replay was to be at Evertons ground – Goodison Park. and It was obvious from the start Kelly wouldn’t be playing and Roy Pritchard was doubtful.
    As it turned out at Goodison the two full backs were Terry Springthorpe, (who had joined the Wolves, during the war after being encouraged to take up football by his father, a former Derby County player) and Alf Crook a local lad making his first appearance in the clubs senior side
    The two reserve backs proved themselves well equal to the task, with Springthorpe keeping the famous Jimmy Delaney in check, and with the only goal of the match coming from Sammy Smyth, Wolves Irish international
    Wolves were in the final.
    The following Saturday April 9th – Wolves entertained Stoke City at Molineux – Laurie Kelly was still unfit and the two backs that day were Pritchard and Springthorpe we won 3-1
    When the Wolves travelled down to Oxford for their overnight stay, Laurie Kelly was fit and well land though only regarded as one of the three reserves, he must have thought there was a good chance he would gain his right back position. and even after their arrival at the hotel in Oxford everyone assumed the the two full backs would be Pritchard and Kelly.
    But when the final team placings were decided upon Laurie Kelly was informed he wouldn’t be playing. Now wether it was the bad news or thee manner in which he received it He immediately left the hotel and returned home.
    A statement later released by the press, declared “ I was so disappointed in being left out of the team, I just wanted to get away from it all”
    But you can bet Stan Cullis never had any doubt’s, No time to reflect on the feelings of individual players, this was up to him. so he dropped his first choice right back Kelly, switched Roy Pritchard into that position, then placed Terry Springthorpe who had performed so well in the Semi-final replay, to left Back.
    And with this proven 100% fit team , he assured himself Victory would be ours , And of course it was.
    Wether this is truth or propaganda :

    At the time of the 1949 Cup Final, my uncle , was working alongside Laurie Kelly’s brother-in law, at Chillington tools, East Park.
    He told me, , of a story being passed around the factory, at that time, regarding Kelly’s distressed withdrawal from the teams hotel at Oxford, and I quote
    “Stan Cullis, for some reason, didn’t tell Kelly, himself, of his last minute decision not to play him ,at Wembley, but left it to Billy Wright to give Kelly the bad news.

    Of Kellys Future –
    Laurie Kelly, would now find the competition hard for a first team position at Wolves, and next season left to play for Huddersfield, were he would distinguish himself making over 230 League and Cup appearances. As a matter of interest , Huddersfield finished 3rd in the first division in 1953-54, with Albion in second place, and the Wolves, for the first time in their history, in top spot. In 1957 Laurie Kelly joined Nuneaton as player manager, but only stayed a few months and retired soon after.

    Below the old cellar head.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.