tonydavies

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    • #5502
      tonydavies
      Participant

      It seems that the car was later purchased from the British authorities by a Danish industrialist who used it regularly to drive to business meetings across Europe. I’d love to know what became of it in later years. Does anyone know if the car still exists?

    • #5461
      tonydavies
      Participant

      In the same vein, have a look at this link which shows the loss of the Central Arcade –

       

      http://www.historywebsite.co.uk/lost/centralarcade.htm

       

      Sad that they couldn’t even save that wonderful facade.

    • #5413
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Ref the old Royal Hospital, it wouldn’t surprise me to see a property developer buy up the place to turn into luxury apartments or office suites. Taking into account the fact that it’s an extremely attractive building, I don’t think they would have too much trouble selling/renting them either. Anything rather than see the place deteriorate again.

    • #5410
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Interesting to see, in the second picture, as one building comes down, another rises in the background. Mander House is still under construction at this time as can be seen by the crane and scaffolding. We lost many of our old buildings for the construction of what I personally look on as an abhorrence on our landscape. As a shopping centre it’s just about acceptable but, a<span class=”entry”><span class=”entry-body”><span class=”runon-head”><span class=”runon-title” title=”Derived word”><span class=”w”>rchitecturally</span></span></span></span></span>, so much more could have been done to meld it into it’s surroundings more sympathetically. The loss of the Star and Garter in Victoria Street and Central Arcade was hard enough to take, but did it have to be replaced with acres of concrete? There are examples of what could have been achieved, with a little imagination, on the Penn Road and Tettenhall Road where the facades of blocks of terraced houses have been kept and new housing built onto the back, thus giving the appearence of well looked after old properties but with all modern facilities available to prospective buyers. All it takes is a little imagination!

      OK! Rant over! How do others feel?

    • #5404
      tonydavies
      Participant

      I’d put a time of the early 1960’s on the picture Billy. You can just make out a Triumph Vitesse turning into the street. The Vitesse started production in 1962 and ran until 1971. That probably makes this one of the last photos taken of the New Hotel before it was demolished. In fact, looking at the pic more closely, it looks as though the upper windows are already out and the demolition process has already started!

    • #5301
      tonydavies
      Participant

      As you say Billy, too easy. Anyone with a knowledge of  “God’s Wonderful Railway” and where  solar energy comes from should get it, but I’ll give someone else a chance of jumping in with the answer!!

    • #5280
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Would this have anything to do with the Unicorn in Oxley Street?

    • #5235
      tonydavies
      Participant

      My local was the Penn Cinema on Warstones Road. My early memories are somewhat vague regarding the first film I saw, but the Saturday matinee was the time all the kids off the estate caused their usual weekly chaos, much to the annoyance of the usherettes! I do have memories of the westerns with Tex Ritter, Gene Autry, and of course, Roy Rogers and Trigger. There was also the gangster film serials with  “The Black Hand Gang” or something along those lines, along with the Disney classics such as Snow White, Pinocchio, etc.

      It was pennies to get in but, if you’d spent your cinema money on “suck”, there was always someone ready to open the side door for a couple of acid drops!

    • #5173
      tonydavies
      Participant

      I don’t think there can be many who, at some time or other, didn’t go for a meal at the Berni. Steak and chips, followed by Black Forest gateau or rumbaba, with a bottle of Blue Nun or Leibfraumilch to slake our thirst!

    • #5140
      tonydavies
      Participant

      One more possibility , Jonny, is that 37 Cannock Road and Newbridge Terrace are one and the same. Victorian builders loved to give their houses names, usually on a plate inset into the brickwork. This extended to the terraces that they built, as in Mimosa Villas, or Elm Cottages, or other grandiose names, even though they resembled neither a villa, or a cottage!

      I’ve just checked the email address on my profile and it is correct, so not sure why you couldn’t make contact.

    • #5133
      tonydavies
      Participant

      The census details above are from the 1881 census. By 1891 it seems that, of the children, only Mary, Joseph, Arthur, and Milbra, are still at the family home with their parents. Daughter Mary is a nail cutter, Joseph is a fitter’s labourer, Arthur is an errand boy, and Milbra is a scholar.
      The family are still at 37 Cannock Road.

      So far those are the only two census  records I can find in regard to Wolverhampton.

      According to records, Aaron married Mary Ann Williams in Wolverhampton in the second quarter (April-June) of 1855. Should you want to get hold of a copy of tis record the numbers you need are Volume 6b Page 586

      Aaron died in Wolverhampton in 1900 aged 65

    • #5132
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Hi Jonny

      So far:-

      Name: Arron Owen
      Age: 45
      Estimated Birth Year: abt 1836
      Relationship to Head: Head
      Spouse: Mary Owen
      Gender: Male
      Where born: Droitwich, Worcestershire, England
      Civil Parish: Wolverhampton
      County/Island: Staffordshire
      Country: England
      Street address: 37 Cannock Rd
      Marital Status: Married
      Education:

      Employment status:

      Occupation: Boatman
      Registration district: Wolverhampton
      Sub registration
      Name Age
      Arron Owen
      45
      Mary Owen
      44
      Mary Owen
      17
      Milbra Owen
      1
      John Owen
      15
      James Owen
      12
      Richard Owen
      9
      Arthur Owen
      7
      Joseph Owen
      3

       

    • #5128
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Hi Jonny,

       

      According to Black Country History – http://blackcountryhistory.org – there was a Newbridge Terrace, Cannock Road, so Billy’s assumption that the demolished terrace next to the Waggon and Horses was Lansdown Terrace could well be right. Alternatively, it could also have been Newbridge Terrace. Normally one would assume that Newbridge Terrace was in the Newbridge area, but who knows what goes through the minds of town planners!! I’ll see what I can turn up on either Ancestry or RootsChat.

    • #5105
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Interesting snippet about John Jones, Billy. Transportation was usually a one way ticket. Even after you’d served your sentence the onus was on the released prisoner to fund their own passage back to Blighty. I wonder if John Jones ever made it back? Good programme on at the moment – Banished. It doesn’t paint a very nice picture of life as a transportee.

       

       

    • #5096
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Hi Jonny,

       

      I’ve had a look online and the only Lansdown Terrace I can find is on Tettenhall Road.

      Have a look at this site – http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-378593-lansdowne-terrace-/map

      I coudn’t find North Bridge Street, but there is a Bridge Street in Springfields, just off the Wednesfield Road. On the 1901 OS map for Wolverhampton NE it’s shown as running across the top of Culwell Street and Bagnal Street, and alongside the railway line. This address is close to the Birmingham Canal so could be a possibility.

      There’s also a site on the internet called RootsChat which, like Billy’s board, is free to join and there is a section on there for boat people, so that may be worth looking at. The people on there are very friendly and helpful.

      If you need any more help feel free to email me. You can find my email address by clicking on my name at the side of this message.

       

      Tony

    • #4997
      tonydavies
      Participant

      You asked if anyone had memories of the old Wolves Club, Billy. I remember it well. A friend used to run the Monday night discos there in the early 1970’s. It was also the place where I met my wife some 42 years ago – and her a “baggies” supporter!! Match days are fun in our house!

    • #4969
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Terry’s right about the West Brom bus stop outside the Co-op Billy. I used to walk my then girlfriend, now the missus, to the stop regularly. I believe it was the number 79. It ran along the Bilston Road past the New Inns and Steelway, and then on to West Brom via Wednesbury.

    • #4917
      tonydavies
      Participant

      The building in the background on the right of the picture looks like the new market building that housed the Woolpack. I’ll take a guess at the building of the flats around Dale Street and Hallet Drive, but from which street I have no idea!

    • #4894
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Just an interesting snippet for you Billy. Vivien Leigh was born Vivien Mary Hartley in the grounds of my old boarding school, St Paul’s,  in Darjeeling – although some other schools in the area have tried to claim her as theirs!

    • #4881
      tonydavies
      Participant

      You’ve got me with this one Billy! Being a mere stripling of 67, this is way before I started going to the “flicks”, and it would have  beeen years before I’d have been allowed to see something scary! Having no clue to go on I wouldn’t have any idea where to start researching. Hope someone else has better luck.

    • #4851
      tonydavies
      Participant

      I’m guessing that this is possibly one of the more obscure cars built by Guy Motors, or one of Varley-Woods vehicles which were built by Turners. I know Guy Motors dabbled with car manufacture for a time before concentrating on commercial vehicles, and they did have an open tourer out around the early 1920s.

      Varley-Woods didn’t have a great deal of success with their models, and I believe they were only in production for about a year.

      I’m going for Guy Motors.

       

    • #4831
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Well done George! I’d written my guess out earlier, went away to do something else, and came back and posted without checking to see if there were anymore replies. Such a shame that so many ornate pieces are gone forever.

    • #4827
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Is this something to do with the underground toilets in Queens Square? Looking more closely at the gate, it does seem as though there are steps leading downwards, and the building in the background does have a resemblance to the block of buildings housing Costa

    • #4817
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Second stab (in the dark!). Back of the Molineau Hotel and a gate into the football ground?

      Alternatively, A gate into Giffard House with the Hotel in the background.

    • #4814
      tonydavies
      Participant

      The building in the background looks like Giffard House. Given that there’s a road between the gate and the house, I’ll take a stab at the old Wholesale Market in Wulfruna Street.

    • #4796
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Now you mention it Billy, I did see Coal Pitt Road but didn’t connect it with Horseley Fields! Sometimes I think I should believe the evidence of my eyes!! Still, it did give me an excuse to get the old maps out again – never a bad thing.

    • #4786
      tonydavies
      Participant

      When you asked this question, Billy, I thought I’d get my 1901 OS map of Wolverhampton (NE) and Heath Town out and have a quick scan. Guess what? That section is just off the page! Also checked Isaac Taylor’s map of 1750 but that was way too early. Unless I can find something on-line I have to admit to being stumped this time.

    • #4775
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Nice picture Billy, but I think the car is a Morris 8 from somewhere around 1936.

      There’s one in this picture – if the advert is still there – for £6350!

      http://www.carandclassic.co.uk/car/C496600

       

    • #4769
      tonydavies
      Participant

      As a fan of old vehicles, I love the first two pictures. The registration numbers in the first picture would be worth quite a lot of money today.

      The old Poly was a familiar sight on my way to school every day as we, St Peter’s, were just around the corner.

    • #4768
      tonydavies
      Participant

      My mistake Billy. Reg Hollingsworth didn’t join Wolves until the 1927 season.

      I’m going for the final official, Val Gregory.

    • #4756
      tonydavies
      Participant

      I think the Wolves players were Richards and Hollingsworth with Tom Phillipson taking on the roll of linesman, but there was also a Harold Shaw who played for the team around that era, so could he be one of the three?

       

    • #4752
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Two of the names, Gill and Dickin, in the Retail Team seem familiar. I believe that they were meat purveyors. In fact, if I’m right, I used to drink with J Dickin’s grandson, Phil.

      My guess is that they were all involved in the meat trade. (And me a long term vegetarian!!)

    • #4683
      tonydavies
      Participant

      “I only hope in the near future that when some more enterprising business takes over the building they will move that piece of unattractive facade, to reveal the old public house coat of arms and its frontage in all its glory.”

       

      I’m with you on that, Billy. How anyone can think that the current facia is attractive is beyond me! I used to walk around Wolverhampton looking above street level to get an idea of how the town used to look in the past – before “modernism” reared it’s head.

    • #4680
      tonydavies
      Participant

      I’m  assuming that Maplins in Dudley St is the same building, or site of building, that was formerly the Dudley Arms.

      Such a shame that we’ve lost so many wonderful old buildings in the name of progress.

    • #4675
      tonydavies
      Participant

      The one that comes to mind is Maplins, although what that company’s connection is to the Ward family I have no idea.

    • #4672
      tonydavies
      Participant

      I’m wondering if this is anything to do with the Dudley Arms that stood in Dudley Street? The Ward family who, through marriage, inherited the title of Lords of Dudley,were resident at Himley Hall until the 1830s. I believe that their coat of arms decorated the front of the buiding in Dudley Street.

       

    • #4637
      tonydavies
      Participant

      The Duke’s Head on Duke Street?

    • #4633
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Some memories there George! Mention of Billy Wilson brought back memories of his place in Bilston St where, to drum up more trade, he employed a young lady who would cut your hair topless! (She was topless, not your hair!) Some time later he moved to a place next to the Connaught Hotel on Tettenhall Road. His son Mitch, and daughter Tracey, both went into hair dressing and worked with him. Mitch was employed by no less than Duran Duran as their personal hair stylist. Tracey went one better and married one of them!

      Being a” baby boomer”, my teenage years were the 60s and 70s. This was a time when some of us found that visiting a hairdresser was quite unnecessary. The locks got longer, the parent’s tempers shorter! Many a time I was threatened with an unscheduled haircut as I slept. Thankfully, the threat was never carried out, and the hair was allowed to flourish (for the time that I had it anyway!). These days, as George mentions, furniture polish would be more appropriate that any of the wonder products marketed by the hair trade. I still have the photos to look at wistfully, but I don’t miss the wolf-whistles – I can’t run very fast these days!

    • #4611
      tonydavies
      Participant

      I’ll go for the Grand Theatre, the only one still operational. All the others have been demolished or have changed use.

    • #4605
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Well, Head over Heels with Jessie Matthews was released in America in February 1937 and the King’s speech, alluded to in some of the adverts, took place on the 12th May in that year, so I’d guess at May 1937 for the date.

      Odd one out? The Dale seems to be the only one outside Wolverhampton, but knowing how devious Billy’s questions can be, I suspect that’s too easy!

    • #4600
      tonydavies
      Participant

      I do have some vague memory of the incident Billy but I’m afraid I’m at a loss when it comes to the name of the tailors. I’d left Bates’s by then and was working at the cobblers at the top of Bell Street, next to Rudlers.

    • #4589
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Now I feel really stupid! I used to work next door to this place in the 1960s at Bates Shoes on Dudley Street and used to use this clock to check whether I was late for work.  Did it used to be a branch of Burtons, Billy? It was on the corner where you now walk down to the Mander Centre. What it was in 1951 is another question. (I was only 4yrs old then!!)

    • #4587
      tonydavies
      Participant

      My initial thought was Burton’s, but there was also a clock on the corner opposite, so I ruled that one out. The brickwork reminded me of the dairy on Penn Rd, but that was always a dairy, not a tailors! Was there one above Buxton and Bonnet? I can’t remember seeing one! For a wild guess, how about the Red House on the corner of Victoria Street?

    • #4568
      tonydavies
      Participant

      I can do the easy bit Billy! The lady in question is the Queen Mother. As for the place and year, I’ll leave that to some of the more knowledgeable members. ( One out of three isn’t bad!!)

    • #4564
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Of the two, I’d go for Wightwick Manor. Geoffrey Mander bequeathed the House to the National Trust in 1937.

    • #4537
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Excellent picture Billy. It shows the devastation these explosions cause when things go wrong. With regard to the Lanesfield explosion, the newspaper report states,

      “About one-third of the boiler was ripped off and flew off at an angle and, avoiding the canal, falling in a flat mass on the wharf of the Parkfield Company, 150 yards away.”

      I suppose it was lucky that only two people were killed in the explosion. The injured were variously stated as between three and twenty.

      I have newspaper reports from the Birmingham Daily Post, London Standard, Cheshire Observer, and the Sheffield and Rotherham Independent,  so the next stop is Wolverhampton archives to get the report from the Express and Star.

    • #4528
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Forgot to add –

      Regarding Eric Lees, I would need to know his place of birth to come up with information for him. If you could find out anything about his wife, ie names, that would also help.

    • #4527
      tonydavies
      Participant

      Hello Maxine.

      I’ve done a little digging and have come up with the following courtesy of http://www.freebmd.org.uk/

      Ernest’s parents were Grace A Whittingham and John A Morgan who married in the last quarter of 1938 in Wolverhampton. It looks as though Ernest had four sisters –

      Joan, born 1939, Catherine, born 1940, Maureen, born 1944, and Valerie born 1947

      If you need any more help just leave a message here for me

      Tony

    • #4522
      tonydavies
      Participant

      True Billy, although I was only able to find Enoch’s grave with the help of the people at Holy Trinity as there is no headstone marker.

      Infant mortality also took it’s toll on the Elwells, as it did on so many families of that era and, again thanks to some sterling work by the staff at Holy Trinity, I’ve managed to locate two of Enoch’s children. Both sadly preceded him to the great beyond.

    • #4518
      tonydavies
      Participant

      All very interesting Billy. I suppose one question would be, “was the Manly Arms around in the mid 1800s?” I suppose it’s possible that Enoch and his family were in “digs” there.

      The Elwell family seems to be quite a big one. Bilston, Sedgley, Wolverhampton, and Cheslyn Hay all have them. My own interest is of the Heath Town family of Enoch and Sarah of Wolverhampton Road, Heath Town.

      Enoch, my Great, Great-grandfather, came to a particularly horrific end, when a boiler he was working near at the Lanesfield Ironworks exploded, killing him instantly. A newspaper of the time stated that he was “dreadfully burned”. Also killed was one John Shorthouse, the boiler fireman, whose body was “shockingly mutilated”.

      Even though the boiler had been examined  and found to be “not in a sufficiently good condition for assurance” and that although it was originally designed to work at 32lbs pressure per sq.in. it had been repaired so many times that  it was recommended that the pressure should not exceed 20lbs per sq in, it continued to be worked at full capacity. The inquest ruled that the owner, Mr H de Simencourt, was not under any obligation to adhere to the recommendation  of the Inspector Midland and Steam Boiler Inspection and Assurance Company, and had simply used his discretion to carry on using the faulty boiler. The jury at the Inquest returned a verdict of “Accidental Death” on the two unfortunate fatalities. I dare say neither family received any form of compensation for their losses. Enoch was only in his early thirties when he died leaving a wife and family to fend for themselves. He is buried in Holy Trinity churchyard.

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